Reflections Can Be Hard

Reflections can be challenging. Looking back at what you have accomplished is more complex than remembering what you should have done better. WHY!!??? This should not be the case! As we look back on this school year, we have accomplished so much, overcame, adapted, and lost. We should be able to say, “This year was …, but I made it the best I could with what I had”. When looking back at what we have accomplished and looking forward to the future goals,, we need to have the ability to recognize and celebrate what we have achieved. Here’s to a school year like no other.

In education, we have lost a lot of teachers to burnout. The stress of the current education profession is unprecedented. Students have changed, teachers have changed, the administration has changed, and policies have changed. COVID not only impacts the body systems but also impacts the environment we live and interact with. Masks have been removed,, and distances closed,, but we have never been so far apart. Eye contact is brutal, all social interaction is tricky, OR we have just forgotten how to do it. Why is this? I believe it is related to reflections. We struggle (I do, for sure) to see what we are doing good and focus more on the added stress of the whole picture.

Reading an article published by Education Week, I believe the stress comes from the gaps during COVID. “It’s heartbreaking. The pressure is overwhelming,” Bouchard said. “I feel like a horrible teacher. I’ve been teaching for 22 years, and this might be the lowest self-esteem I’ve had.” I have heard this from countless teachers who are excellent but can not see past the tree. Each learning opportunity does grow the next. Some students will struggle due to this loss, but growth will happen. Getting back into a schedule with teachers who know their craft will help this loss of learning.

“Preoccupied with a single leaf, you won’t see the tree. Preoccupied with a single tree, you’ll miss the entire forest.” This quote from Takuan Soho identifies an issue with not seeing the big picture. This has changed, in my opinion, drastically. We have to focus on the leaf so the tree can grow, focus on the tree, so it rises to build a more substantial forest, and focus on the forest to develop a better world. Educators focus on the minor aspects to create a stronger student. This is what we do now and have always done. We have to take that aspect as a significant positive and grow from that. Education is not the same, but life is not the same. As humans, we adapt to meet the environment better we are exposed to with the ultimate goal of survival. Each experience allows us the gift of a lesson learned. Teachers showed their ability to adapt. Technology was used in ways that it has never been used before in education. If you question this statement I have a few videos of kindergarten students video meeting with their teacher through Google Meet. This alone would have never happened before the pandemic. Our teachers are resilient, to say the least, amazing would be better.

Reflections are tough. In some considerations, we see all of what we should have done or actions that should have been better. We look back at a situation or interaction with a critical eye. We all have areas that we could improve, but take note of the areas in which you are great. Education is not accessible, just ask any parent who had to deal with COVID teaching. Society forgets how many times they wished the schools to open and their students to return. We were heroes during that time, and we are still heroes now. Take solace in the fact that you work in a job that can be thankless but at the same time worthy of all awards. Awards for patients, caring, support, growth, and shaping our future should be given. You are an EDUCATOR, be proud of what you have done and what you will accomplish in the future.

Your partner in education and parenting,

Doug Greek EdD

Author: Douglas Greek EdD

My name is Doug Greek and I am a parent with an Education Doctorate. My Doctorate is in the area of leadership and curriculum and I have been a teacher for 15 years (as of 2021). I believe I am both book-educated and life-educated when it comes to child development. I am a first-generation college graduate as well as a first-generation educator. I have had all of the “classes” of theory and practicality in the area of child development and education BUT this all went out the window when my wife and I had our first child. We were married for 14 years before having kids, so I thought we were ready. Even after 26 years of marriage, we are still learning. https://open.spotify.com/show/0L4J63EbZAixPAgNYbxU3q

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