Technology in the Classroom

Technology can feel very daunting in an elementary classroom, but it does not have to. Use the link below to learn more.

Technology can feel very daunting in an elementary classroom, but it does not have to. Teachers have been teaching for years before technology, as we know it, even came into the picture. When the first pencil became the “new thing,” we probably had someone who scoffed at the notion of using lead as a writing utensil. The exact definition of technology is something that makes work easier. This is what technology in the classroom can and should be doing. Streamlining the effort of work is the purpose of using technology in our lessons. 

The other part of using technology in the classroom is to teach students the proper usage. Technology can become a distraction and an interruption in the learning process. I have had teachers tell me they are not using technology at all, then complain their students take too long to log in to the device. Practice and being proactive is the key to using technology in your classroom. This is not an automatic practice nor an easy task at first. With practice, the time it takes for students to navigate learning resources will streamline. The more students learn, the more they will know, this is the case in using technology also. 


Another misconception when using technology is that “more is better.” This is not the case. In some instances, one technology used correctly and entirely is more powerful than many tools used halfway. Take Google Docs as an example. Google Docs can meet most needs in the classroom. Docs can be used as a presentation tool, infographic creator, close reading resource, differentiation in the area of speech to text and audio to read, data tracking, book creator, and many more. Have students create their rough draft using speech to text then print it for them to edit. This practice will allow students to speak freely without worrying about typing or spelling. It is not a written law that students have to create with pencil and paper. Allow for the option; this is the key to using technology. 

TPACK is a technology integration framework that identifies three types of knowledge instructors need to combine for successful edtech integration—technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (a.k.a. TPACK).


Technology, Pedagogy, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) have to be balanced in today’s classroom. Plenty of research has proven that the balance of technology and purpose is critical in moving a class from average to above-average academically. This is mostly because the technology allows students and educators access to outside resources. Schools that do not embrace this concept are doing a disservice to our future leaders. Embracing the balance of TPACK should be a common practice among administrators, which will model best practices for their educators and students. To learn more about TPACK, click the link provided here.


Technology is not the goal or destination. Technology is a vessel that we use to travel more efficiently. The real question is, how can technology aid me in the classroom? The first step to answering this question is knowledge. Look at the learning goal, then chose the strategy, LASTLY select the tool. If you don’t know the objective, you will never arrive at that goal. If your goal is to have your students understand “X,” then decide how you help them to understand “X” and choose the tool to reinforce that strategy. If you are at a loss for the strategy, Dr. John Hattie and Dr. Robbert Marzano may be able to help.

Both researchers have completed extensive research on this topic, and you can read more using this link

Last thoughts
If you want to fight and resist technology usage because you are not comfortable, then your students will suffer. As educators, our job is to support and prepare our students as they grow. If we do not allow them to learn proper technology usage, then they will learn on their own. In some cases, this causes misconceptions in their learning journey. You, as an educator, are the best at what you do because you have learned from others. Embracing technology affords your students to learn from you. Students need to be allowed to fail in a safe and caring environment. The teacher provides this environment for students daily. 
In future posts, I will spend some time exploring resources and how to use them in your quest for authentic learning opportunities. 


Douglas Greek EdD, your partner in Educational Technology 

Balance is critical in most situations.

Balance is key. In education, we try to find the fine line between frustration and learning. If you search this topic, you will find, “The zone of proximal development (sometimes abbreviated ZPD), is the difference between what a learner can do without help and what he or she can do with help. It is a concept developed by Soviet psychologist and social constructivist Lev Vygotsky (1896 – 1934).” If the ZPD is not found, a student can get to the point of frustration very quickly and shut down. In a perfect world, students would come to us with a “tag” that states what their ZPD is and the directions to follow in the quest for academic growth, not the case. So, what can we do to meet each student’s individual needs? Technology can be the answer (in some cases, not all).

Technology allows the time needed to assess each student then prescribe the needed resources to scaffold the student to their ZPD. Most programs that have Artificial Intelligence (AI) integration will adjust the difficulty of the questions based on how the student answers the delivered questions. An adaptive assessment may take 20 minutes to complete, but it can take that much time for each student in a classroom. This technology does NOT take the place of a well-informed and connected educator. Taking the data from the AI and comparing it with anecdotal notes and teacher observation is how we can support students best. I can already hear your thoughts! If the teacher has to do the work, why would they ever use technology to arrive at the same conclusion?! If you have ever evaluated 25+ students over a week, you will have to admit you get tired super quick, and the stories or math evaluations haunt you in your dreams. We are human; computer programs are not. This is why balance is essential. What does this look like in the classroom? In the next section, we will explore two resources of MANY. The two I have included here are, in my opinion, the best place to begin. I hope you find them helpful also. ReadingIQ is a fantastic resource that allows you to choose how the reading levels are reported and allows students to take a placement test. This is a FREE

This is a FREE digital resource in both fiction and nonfiction from Marvel, Pixar, National Geographic, and others that students will love to read. This is a great resource for teachers and meets all of the safety measures that are expected in our classrooms today (COPPA, CIPA, FERPA). Resources available in Reading IQ include all Disney products. 

With audiobooks and graphic novels, students of all ages can benefit from this excellent resource, and it is FREE. I know there are a bunch of other resources like GetEpic, Tumblebooks, and many many more. This resource has built-in differentiation through the assessment and different reading levels. Finding one resource to meet all of your students’ needs can be difficult, but with this one and your small group reading practice, and written material, you will give your students options that are engaging for them and you. In math, I like Prodigy Math, and before you start yelling at the computer that all students do is play games, read me out on this one. If you assign practice to your students based on what you know about your students, this is the program for you. First off, it is 100% free and easily navigatable for most. In the planner area of the program, you can assign activities to individual students or the whole class. When assigning activities, you mitigate the loss of time while using the program. There is no placement test, but in this instance, your knowledge as the teacher is more valuable than a placement test. 

If you are not assigning activities to your students in Prodigy, you SHOULD NOT be using this program. It is a waste of time if you do not spend some time. This is a powerful program, and with great power comes great responsibility (Uncle Ben, Spiderman). 

Final Thoughts

The vital aspect of any technology usage is a balance. Without balance, we will either not use technology at all, which is not an option for our students, or we will lose the personal connection that is also something our students need to be successful. Don’t place a student in front of a program and expect them to learn in the absents of the teacher and a personal connection. Students need to learn in their ZPD, and technology can only help. You, as the teacher/parent, need to use your professional judgment in choosing the right tool, digital and non-digital. 

Your partner in education and parenting,

Douglas Greek 

%d bloggers like this: